firsttimeuser:

Girl in Satin Dress with Roses by Gertrude Käsebier
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

firsttimeuser:

Girl in Satin Dress with Roses by Gertrude Käsebier

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

(via hoodoothatvoodoo)



siralexrogers:

Due to high sulfur levels, inhabitants of the Izu Islands had to wear gas masks to survive. What results? Some of the scariest wedding photos ever

siralexrogers:

Due to high sulfur levels, inhabitants of the Izu Islands had to wear gas masks to survive. What results? Some of the scariest wedding photos ever

(Source: whateverthereistodo, via dankskankmuse)


I sensed one could simultaneously love a man to the point of submitting to him and love oneself to the point of hating him because he subjugates us.
Lélia, George Sand (via proofrawk)


theholyprepuce:

The Lamentation of Dead ChristAndrea Mantegna - c. 1480
Unique to this painting is a design that places the central focus of the image on Christ’s genitals - an artistic choice hinting at ‘angel lust’, or post-mortem erection, observed in the corpses of human males who have been executed.
According to the 1983 scholarly work, The Sexuality of Christ in Renaissance Art and in Modern Oblivion by art historian and critic Leo Steinberg, a number of Renaissance era artists depicted Jesus Christ after His crucifixion with a post-mortem erection. The artwork was suppressed by the Roman Catholic Church for several centuries.
At first glance, the painting seems to be a strikingly realistic study in foreshortening.  However, careful scrutiny reveals that Mantegna reduced the size of the figure’s feet, which, as he must have known, would cover much of the body if properly represented.

theholyprepuce:

The Lamentation of Dead Christ
Andrea Mantegna - c. 1480

Unique to this painting is a design that places the central focus of the image on Christ’s genitals - an artistic choice hinting at ‘angel lust’, or post-mortem erection, observed in the corpses of human males who have been executed.

According to the 1983 scholarly work, The Sexuality of Christ in Renaissance Art and in Modern Oblivion by art historian and critic Leo Steinberg, a number of Renaissance era artists depicted Jesus Christ after His crucifixion with a post-mortem erection. The artwork was suppressed by the Roman Catholic Church for several centuries.

At first glance, the painting seems to be a strikingly realistic study in foreshortening.  However, careful scrutiny reveals that Mantegna reduced the size of the figure’s feet, which, as he must have known, would cover much of the body if properly represented.

(via fuckyeahrenaissancehistory)


I love you. I love you,
but I’m turning to my verses
and my heart is closing
like a fist.
Frank O’Hara, from “Mayakovsky”  (via vintague)

(Source: proustitute, via foreversincebreakfast)



Everyone, at some point in their lives, wakes up in the middle of the night with the feeling that they are all alone in the world, and that nobody loves them now and that nobody will ever love them, and that they will never have a decent night’s sleep again and will spend their lives wandering blearily around a loveless landscape, hoping desperately that their circumstances will improve, but suspecting, in their heart of hearts, that they will remain unloved forever. The best thing to do in these circumstances is to wake somebody else up, so that they can feel this way, too.
Lemony Snicket (via desgrandsflchss)

(Source: onomatoteca, via a-m-b-e-d-o)



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